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NONI

NONI FRUIT EXTRACTS

A double-blind clinical safety study of noni fruit juice

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20443518

A safety study of TAHITIAN NONI Juice from Tahiti was conducted with ninety-six healthy volunteers. For 28 days, participants consumed one of four daily quantities of noni juice: 0 mL (placebo), 30 mL, 300 mL, or 750 mL. All daily dose formulations were standardized to 750 mL by making up any volume differences with the placebo. Hematology, biochemistry, urinalysis, vital signs, and adverse events measurements were made at 0 (baseline), 2, and 4 weeks, as well as during a two-week follow up (week 6).

Electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements were also made for each volunteer during the pre-study screen and at week 6. During the trial, those in the noni groups experienced 20 to 50% fewer total adverse events than those in the placebo group. A marginally significant (P<0.1) reduction in the number of constant adverse events experienced by the volunteers was also found in the 300 mL noni juice group.

A similar trend was observed in the other noni juice groups, as well. No other clinically significant differences between any of the groups were noted in the parameters and measurements of this study, nor was there evidence suggesting any adverse dose-related effects. The results of this study indicate that drinking up to 750 mL TAHITIAN NONI Juice per day is safe.

Noni juice improves serum lipid profiles and other risk markers in cigarette smokers

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23097636

Cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leads to dyslipidemia and systemic inflammation. Morinda citrifolia (noni) fruit juice has been found previously to have a significant antioxidant activity. One hundred thirty-two adult heavy smokers completed a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to investigate the effect of noni juice on serum cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and homocysteine.

Volunteers drank noni juice or a fruit juice placebo daily for one month. Drinking 29.5 mL to 188 mL of noni juice per day significantly reduced cholesterol levels, triglycerides, and hs-CRP. Decreases in LDL and homocysteine, as well increases in HDL, were also observed among noni juice drinkers. The placebo, which was devoid of iridoid glycosides, did not significantly influence blood lipid profiles or hs-CRP. Noni juice was able to mitigate cigarette smoke-induced dyslipidemia, an activity associated with the presence of iridoids.

Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Activities of a Commercial Noni Juice revealed by Carrageenan-induced Paw Edema.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27760029

This review investigated the relationship of noni juice, or its extract (fruit, leaves or root), to anticancer and/or immunostimulant properties. A Medline search was conducted using the key search words 'Morinda citrifolia' and 'Morinda citrifolia and cancer' (1964 to October, 2011) along with cross-referencing. Botanical and chemical indexes were not included.

A total of 304 and 29 (10%) articles, respectively, were found under these key terms. Of the 19 studies actually related to cancer, seven publications were in vitro cancer studies, nine were in vivo animal cancer studies, and three were in vivo human cancer studies. Among the in vitro studies, a 'concentrated component' in noni juice and not pure noni juice may (1) stimulate the immune system to 'possibly' assist the body fight the cancer, and (2) kill a small percentage (0-36%) of cancer cells depending on the type.

The nine animal studies suggest that a concentrated component in noni juice may stimulate the immune system; but only slightly increases the number (about 1/3; 25-45%) of surviving mice. Other than two case studies, only two human clinical studies existed. The first consisted of testing freeze-dried noni fruit, which reduced pain perception, but did not reverse advanced cancer. The second was on smokers ingesting an unknown concentration of noni juice who experienced decreased aromatic DNA adducts, and decreased levels of plasma superoxide anion radicals and lipid hydroperoxide.

Factors to consider in the future are clearly defining the substance being tested, and whether or not the juice is pasteurized. Some reports of hepatotoxicity exist, although there were confounding factors in most of the case reports. More importantly, noni juice is high in potassium and needs to be monitored by patients with kidney, liver or heart problems. In conclusion, a few in vitro and in vivo animal studies suggest a possible unidentified substance in unpasteurized noni fruit juice that may have a small degree of anticancer activity. The isolation of the active component warrants further research